Novel Update: Beta Readers

After editing my novel, HIGH, the last couple of months, I’ve decided it’s a good time to stop and let the Beta Readers take over. This morning, I took a deep breath and sent them my full manuscript.

As well all know getting feedback from others is an important part of the editing process. We can keep rewriting and editing our stories but until we let someone else read them, we will never know what works and what doesn’t.

So now that my manuscript is in the hands of my trusted beta readers, what’s next? Well, I will be focusing on getting my book cover done, and creating my marketing plan. I’m not quite sure how to begin, but regardless—I’m diving in.

Any tips?

 

0 Replies to “Novel Update: Beta Readers”

  1. So exciting! I love being at the stage of beta readers and cover designing. For the marketing plans, I always contact bloggers in advance to make up a blog tour and help spread the word. Once your fabulous cover is ready, a book cover reveal also builds up the hype. 🙂

    1. Thanks, Sara. Your tips are definitely helpful. I think you’re right. Time to email bloggers and start the hype. I’m hoping to reveal my book cover in about a week.

      I must admit—I am so excited. 🙂

  2. You’re ahead of me in my journey so I’m watching with interest. Well done for sending off to beta readers. I think I will end up pausing at that stage. For quite a while.

    A few authors I follow have just been through the cover design stage and some of the designs are fabulous. Blog tours certainly seem to be popular way of helping to spread the word.

  3. I, unfortunately, didn’t think about promoting my work until I’d already published it, so I’m looking for tips on that, too.

    GoodReads seems to be an excellent resource for independent authors, and you can set up an author’s account for free.

    1. Thanks, Misha! I remember seeing a post on twitter about GoodReads and independent authors and I meant to read the article but forgot, so thank you for reminding me. Yes, I will definitely look into that.

      I will be doing a lot of research the next couple of weeks on marketing and self-publishing. I’ll make sure to post any new tips I learn along the way, so check back often.

  4. Yay! Book covers! I’m now getting into the bad habit of creating them mid-story since it’s my very favorite part! I can’t wait to see your unveiling 🙂

    To add to Sara’s comment, get in contact now with some book bloggers (within your genre!) who might be willing accept ARCs prior to release to get some reviews up ahead of time. Readers always like to see reviews before they purchase.

    Also, take a deep breath! You should be so proud that you’ve made it to this point!

    1. Thanks, Lauren! I actually created the book cover in February. I just need to do a few more edits and it should be good to go. Book covers are exciting, especially when they’re your own. One thing we wouldn’t be able to be involved in if we were traditionally published. To me, this is another perk for being self-published.

      Thanks for the tip on book bloggers and getting reviewed ahead of time. I’m adding it to my list of things to do. 🙂

  5. Okay, I’m confessing to ignorance here. What’s the difference between a Beta Reader and an editor? Do Beta Readers charge a fee like editors do? My friend in my critique group is an indie fantasy writer, and she only uses an editor. Perhaps our critique group serves as her Beta Readers, because we all give her our input and check for the same types of things they would. She pays her editor good money. Good luck Corey. I still haven’t finished my novel. I’ve got one more chapter left and an epilogue, so I’m getting there.

    1. Hi Lori,
      Beta readers are people who read and critique your book for free. They can be from your writer’s/critique group or friends or even family you trust. They’re anyone you trust who can give you the feedback you need. An editor is someone who also helps you prepare your manuscript for print, but usually charges. Some self-published writers skip the editor process if they feel they’ve polished their manuscripts enough with the help of beta readers and proofreaders. Some may do all three: beta readers, proofreaders and editors.

      Thanks, Lori. And good luck to you and your novel too. It’s an exciting process. I can’t wait to hear about your novel.

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Novel Update: Beta Readers

After editing my novel, HIGH, the last couple of months, I’ve decided it’s a good time to stop and let the Beta Readers take over. This morning, I took a deep breath and sent them my full manuscript.

As well all know getting feedback from others is an important part of the editing process. We can keep rewriting and editing our stories but until we let someone else read them, we will never know what works and what doesn’t.

So now that my manuscript is in the hands of my trusted beta readers, what’s next? Well, I will be focusing on getting my book cover done, and creating my marketing plan. I’m not quite sure how to begin, but regardless—I’m diving in.

Any tips?

 

0 Replies to “Novel Update: Beta Readers”

  1. So exciting! I love being at the stage of beta readers and cover designing. For the marketing plans, I always contact bloggers in advance to make up a blog tour and help spread the word. Once your fabulous cover is ready, a book cover reveal also builds up the hype. 🙂

    1. Thanks, Sara. Your tips are definitely helpful. I think you’re right. Time to email bloggers and start the hype. I’m hoping to reveal my book cover in about a week.

      I must admit—I am so excited. 🙂

  2. You’re ahead of me in my journey so I’m watching with interest. Well done for sending off to beta readers. I think I will end up pausing at that stage. For quite a while.

    A few authors I follow have just been through the cover design stage and some of the designs are fabulous. Blog tours certainly seem to be popular way of helping to spread the word.

  3. I, unfortunately, didn’t think about promoting my work until I’d already published it, so I’m looking for tips on that, too.

    GoodReads seems to be an excellent resource for independent authors, and you can set up an author’s account for free.

    1. Thanks, Misha! I remember seeing a post on twitter about GoodReads and independent authors and I meant to read the article but forgot, so thank you for reminding me. Yes, I will definitely look into that.

      I will be doing a lot of research the next couple of weeks on marketing and self-publishing. I’ll make sure to post any new tips I learn along the way, so check back often.

  4. Yay! Book covers! I’m now getting into the bad habit of creating them mid-story since it’s my very favorite part! I can’t wait to see your unveiling 🙂

    To add to Sara’s comment, get in contact now with some book bloggers (within your genre!) who might be willing accept ARCs prior to release to get some reviews up ahead of time. Readers always like to see reviews before they purchase.

    Also, take a deep breath! You should be so proud that you’ve made it to this point!

    1. Thanks, Lauren! I actually created the book cover in February. I just need to do a few more edits and it should be good to go. Book covers are exciting, especially when they’re your own. One thing we wouldn’t be able to be involved in if we were traditionally published. To me, this is another perk for being self-published.

      Thanks for the tip on book bloggers and getting reviewed ahead of time. I’m adding it to my list of things to do. 🙂

  5. Okay, I’m confessing to ignorance here. What’s the difference between a Beta Reader and an editor? Do Beta Readers charge a fee like editors do? My friend in my critique group is an indie fantasy writer, and she only uses an editor. Perhaps our critique group serves as her Beta Readers, because we all give her our input and check for the same types of things they would. She pays her editor good money. Good luck Corey. I still haven’t finished my novel. I’ve got one more chapter left and an epilogue, so I’m getting there.

    1. Hi Lori,
      Beta readers are people who read and critique your book for free. They can be from your writer’s/critique group or friends or even family you trust. They’re anyone you trust who can give you the feedback you need. An editor is someone who also helps you prepare your manuscript for print, but usually charges. Some self-published writers skip the editor process if they feel they’ve polished their manuscripts enough with the help of beta readers and proofreaders. Some may do all three: beta readers, proofreaders and editors.

      Thanks, Lori. And good luck to you and your novel too. It’s an exciting process. I can’t wait to hear about your novel.

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