Novel Update: Editing

“The first draft of anything is shit.”
-Ernest Hemingway

It’s been a while since I last updated you on the progress of my first novel. I spent the last few weeks rewriting and editing my full manuscript on my computer and I’m happy to say that I finally finished that part of the editing process this weekend.

The next step is printing the whole manuscript and reading it over again, this time on paper. It’s amazing to see what we catch from looking at printed copies that we may have missed on the computer.

Here’s a summary of my editing process:
Edit on screen (computer)
Edit off screen (on paper)
Apply necessary changes
Send manuscript to Beta Readers
Apply necessary changes based on feedback
Edit on screen and off screen
Send manuscript to proofreader and editor
Apply necessary changes
Edit on screen and off screen

I am aiming to finish the whole editing process by October.

Although editing can be time consuming, it’s an important part of the process and should not be skipped or taken lightly. As a soon-to-be self-published author, it’s my responsibility to deliver my book in a professional manner. I want my future readers to enjoy the story I have written and not be distracted by typos and other careless mistakes.

What’s your editing process?

0 Replies to “Novel Update: Editing”

  1. October sounds like a great goal! My editing process is pretty similar to yours. Only I’ve had to get three beta readers for my last book, because I chose to write this immensely complicated story and there was a huge need for clarification and details. :O

    Happy editing!

    1. 3 is a good number for beta readers. I went a little nuts and asked 5 people to do it. Can’t wait to get their feedback soon.

      By the way, I am working on your questions. 🙂

    1. Yes, I agree. It’s a helpful process to give it a “rest” for a bit. Other writers also suggest that after the first draft to let weeks, sometimes even months pass before you look at it again.

  2. Well, my old editing process (the one I’m in the final stages of, thank GOD), is this:
    1. write book
    2. edit book
    3. mother edits book
    4. i edit book
    5. mother edits book
    6. i edit book
    etc.
    Beta readers get involved in that process about 6 years down the line. It’s made for a really great book, but it’s taken a long time to get there, lol. My NEW process will hopefully cut down that process to three or four months *fingers crossed!*

    1. This book I’m getting ready to publish has taken a few years too, mainly because it started off as a novella and then later became a novel. But it’s gone through quite a bit of editing and rewriting. After all this time, I feel that the way it is now is so much better than the way it was at the very beginning. I do hope the next books I write won’t take as long to edit and publish. Just like you…fingers crossed. 🙂

  3. I do almost all of my writing and editing in my head. By the time I actually type something, I’ve agonized over each word. Consequently, I don’t do much editing, mostly I read it out loud for errors in grammar. I have an editor, who is also my mother, but who has worked as freelance editor for years and will be brutal with my work if it needs it. My beta readers tend to also be members of my family, although I have also shared some of my work with the members of classes I have taken.

  4. Good job with your progress! I edit every other draft…the other drafts I give to others to look over for me. That way I get more than one pair of eyes to look at it and it gives me a break for when I go back to it I’m not cross-eyed from it. Good luck!

  5. I like the resting in a drawer approach. The book, not me. When I’m writing I find most of my time is spent thinking about the story, the characters, plot holes so like to have a notebook on hand to scribble notes, that’s an important part of the process for me. Helps me between drafts. Otherwise similar to what you’ve said. I do want to go through the beta readers as well. After the next draft 🙂

    1. Yes, the drawer approach works well. Our manuscripts need time to settle while our minds rest. Once reunited with the story, we are able to see clearer, allowing us to rewrite and edit better.

      Thanks, Pete! 🙂

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Novel Update: Editing

“The first draft of anything is shit.”
-Ernest Hemingway

It’s been a while since I last updated you on the progress of my first novel. I spent the last few weeks rewriting and editing my full manuscript on my computer and I’m happy to say that I finally finished that part of the editing process this weekend.

The next step is printing the whole manuscript and reading it over again, this time on paper. It’s amazing to see what we catch from looking at printed copies that we may have missed on the computer.

Here’s a summary of my editing process:
Edit on screen (computer)
Edit off screen (on paper)
Apply necessary changes
Send manuscript to Beta Readers
Apply necessary changes based on feedback
Edit on screen and off screen
Send manuscript to proofreader and editor
Apply necessary changes
Edit on screen and off screen

I am aiming to finish the whole editing process by October.

Although editing can be time consuming, it’s an important part of the process and should not be skipped or taken lightly. As a soon-to-be self-published author, it’s my responsibility to deliver my book in a professional manner. I want my future readers to enjoy the story I have written and not be distracted by typos and other careless mistakes.

What’s your editing process?

0 Replies to “Novel Update: Editing”

  1. October sounds like a great goal! My editing process is pretty similar to yours. Only I’ve had to get three beta readers for my last book, because I chose to write this immensely complicated story and there was a huge need for clarification and details. :O

    Happy editing!

    1. 3 is a good number for beta readers. I went a little nuts and asked 5 people to do it. Can’t wait to get their feedback soon.

      By the way, I am working on your questions. 🙂

    1. Yes, I agree. It’s a helpful process to give it a “rest” for a bit. Other writers also suggest that after the first draft to let weeks, sometimes even months pass before you look at it again.

  2. Well, my old editing process (the one I’m in the final stages of, thank GOD), is this:
    1. write book
    2. edit book
    3. mother edits book
    4. i edit book
    5. mother edits book
    6. i edit book
    etc.
    Beta readers get involved in that process about 6 years down the line. It’s made for a really great book, but it’s taken a long time to get there, lol. My NEW process will hopefully cut down that process to three or four months *fingers crossed!*

    1. This book I’m getting ready to publish has taken a few years too, mainly because it started off as a novella and then later became a novel. But it’s gone through quite a bit of editing and rewriting. After all this time, I feel that the way it is now is so much better than the way it was at the very beginning. I do hope the next books I write won’t take as long to edit and publish. Just like you…fingers crossed. 🙂

  3. I do almost all of my writing and editing in my head. By the time I actually type something, I’ve agonized over each word. Consequently, I don’t do much editing, mostly I read it out loud for errors in grammar. I have an editor, who is also my mother, but who has worked as freelance editor for years and will be brutal with my work if it needs it. My beta readers tend to also be members of my family, although I have also shared some of my work with the members of classes I have taken.

  4. Good job with your progress! I edit every other draft…the other drafts I give to others to look over for me. That way I get more than one pair of eyes to look at it and it gives me a break for when I go back to it I’m not cross-eyed from it. Good luck!

  5. I like the resting in a drawer approach. The book, not me. When I’m writing I find most of my time is spent thinking about the story, the characters, plot holes so like to have a notebook on hand to scribble notes, that’s an important part of the process for me. Helps me between drafts. Otherwise similar to what you’ve said. I do want to go through the beta readers as well. After the next draft 🙂

    1. Yes, the drawer approach works well. Our manuscripts need time to settle while our minds rest. Once reunited with the story, we are able to see clearer, allowing us to rewrite and edit better.

      Thanks, Pete! 🙂

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