Back from the Editor

I’m excited. I’m smiling and I can’t stop. I just got my manuscript back from my editor and I am thrilled to say that I received pretty good feedback. There are minor edits throughout the manuscript, like deleting a few commas, italicizing certain words, etcetera. But the overall feedback was positive. Whew. I can breathe now.

I’m glad I edited my manuscript as much as I did and that I used beta readers to help me tighten and polish my story. After getting feedback from my editor, I feel ready to finally release HIGH.

Now I’m off to the next phase—editing and figuring out when my launch date will be.

Happy writing!

Novel Update: Beta Readers and Their Feedback

After I sent my manuscript to my beta readers, I didn’t look at my story for about a month. It felt good to take a break from editing. It gave me time to work on other things that are still related to my book, like my book cover and editing my synopsis. I gave my beta readers 3 weeks to read and critique my work and within the 3 weeks, I slowly started getting feedback. Each critique was formatted differently and each one varied in length. The longer one took to get back to me, the longer their feedback seemed to be. I’m sure it was a coincidence.

The most gratifying feedback I got was they all liked my plot and characters. To me, this is the most important thing.

After going through all the comments/feedback from each beta reader, I noticed that there were only a few comments that were similar—about 4 to be exact. The rest were different from each other. My challenge now is studying each comment and figuring out which edits to make. Whatever change I end up doing has to work with my story and has to help strengthen my novel.

So far, I’ve looked at each critique and highlighted the changes I feel will help my story. I am currently applying the changes by going through each critique one at a time. For instance, today I’ll do beta reader A’s changes and tomorrow I’ll do beta reader B’s and so on. After applying all the necessary edits, I will be reading my manuscript a few more times until I feel it’s ready for my editor.

I am so thankful to my beta readers for giving me such honest and helpful feedback. This process has definitely helped me learn and grow as a writer.

Would I do it again? Absolutely.

Novel Update: Editing

“The first draft of anything is shit.”
-Ernest Hemingway

It’s been a while since I last updated you on the progress of my first novel. I spent the last few weeks rewriting and editing my full manuscript on my computer and I’m happy to say that I finally finished that part of the editing process this weekend.

The next step is printing the whole manuscript and reading it over again, this time on paper. It’s amazing to see what we catch from looking at printed copies that we may have missed on the computer.

Here’s a summary of my editing process:
Edit on screen (computer)
Edit off screen (on paper)
Apply necessary changes
Send manuscript to Beta Readers
Apply necessary changes based on feedback
Edit on screen and off screen
Send manuscript to proofreader and editor
Apply necessary changes
Edit on screen and off screen

I am aiming to finish the whole editing process by October.

Although editing can be time consuming, it’s an important part of the process and should not be skipped or taken lightly. As a soon-to-be self-published author, it’s my responsibility to deliver my book in a professional manner. I want my future readers to enjoy the story I have written and not be distracted by typos and other careless mistakes.

What’s your editing process?

Novel Update: Editing

“The first draft of anything is shit.”
-Ernest Hemingway

It’s been a while since I last updated you on the progress of my first novel. I spent the last few weeks rewriting and editing my full manuscript on my computer and I’m happy to say that I finally finished that part of the editing process this weekend.

The next step is printing the whole manuscript and reading it over again, this time on paper. It’s amazing to see what we catch from looking at printed copies that we may have missed on the computer.

Here’s a summary of my editing process:
Edit on screen (computer)
Edit off screen (on paper)
Apply necessary changes
Send manuscript to Beta Readers
Apply necessary changes based on feedback
Edit on screen and off screen
Send manuscript to proofreader and editor
Apply necessary changes
Edit on screen and off screen

I am aiming to finish the whole editing process by October.

Although editing can be time consuming, it’s an important part of the process and should not be skipped or taken lightly. As a soon-to-be self-published author, it’s my responsibility to deliver my book in a professional manner. I want my future readers to enjoy the story I have written and not be distracted by typos and other careless mistakes.

What’s your editing process?

Why We Need Beta Readers and Editors

I recently mentioned to a friend that I was self-publishing my first book this November as an e-book, as well as a printed book. I told him that after I edit on my own, I will be passing my manuscript to beta readers, possibly a proofreader and after that, edit it again and then it goes to an editor.

To which he replied: “The editing process is never ending anyway. With the technology now with e-books, why don’t you just eliminate the beta readers and editors and publish your book now and get the readers out there to give their feedback and then revise your book again based on the feedback you get, and then publish it again.

My head spun a little.  So I said, “What do you mean? Revise my book again, even after I’ve already published it?” A bit confused, I added, “Why would I want to do that?”

He said, “Yes, keep revising the same book and publishing it over and over based on the feedback you get from readers.”

I asked, “The same book?”

“Yes, the same book. The one you have now,” he confirmed.

My head spun again. “You mean, just print what I have now and let the readers read and judge it without having beta readers read it first?”

He said, “Yes.”

I said, “But once my book is published—that’s it. I’d like to be done with it so I can move on and start writing other stories. Why would I want to keep revising the same book and publishing it over and over again?”

Completely nonplussed, I asked my friend what the advantages are of doing it the way he’s suggesting. To be honest, I don’t even remember what he said because it probably didn’t make sense to me.

For me, it almost sounds like he’s saying:
“Why don’t you rush and publish your book now, even if you’re not satisfied with it and it hasn’t been read by others who can help you polish it. Who cares? You’ll get feedback from readers outside anyway. You can use the feedback to keep revising and keep publishing THE SAME book, over and over again.

To me, it also sounds like: Why don’t you just put a product out there that hasn’t been tested? Who cares if it doesn’t work? You can keep revising the product anyway?

But wouldn’t I be setting myself up for failure by doing it that way?

First of all, why would I risk my reputation as a first time author and publish a book that’s not polished? Just to get it out there because I can keep revising it anyway? It doesn’t make sense. Also, what happens to the printed pieces?

After researching, reading articles and posts from other writers over the last 6 months on self-publishing and e-books, and seeing the results of self-published authors, my friend’s comment didn’t make any sense to me. I can think of a hundred reasons why I do not think his idea is a good idea. For one, beta readers are there to help you. They will read your book and critique it and give you helpful feedback. If I rushed and published my book now and eliminated the beta readers and editors, I would probably get feedback, but none of which would tell me if I made a typo on page 40 and 180, or that I should rewrite a sentence or a paragraph because something is missing, etcetera. Regular readers won’t give the same feedback. They will give general feedback, but won’t go into specifics like beta readers and editors do.

There are many reasons why a lot of e-books fail and why some succeed. I’ve read a number of posts from self-published writers who all give the same advice:

  1. First, write a good book.
  2. Get people you trust who aren’t family to read it and give you honest feedback (example: beta readers) before you publish.
  3. Hire an editor.
  4. Create a great book cover.
  5. Have a marketing plan.
  6. Know your target audience.

I’m sure my friend meant well. Maybe all he was trying to say was take advantage of technology. But even then, some of the things he suggested didn’t make sense.

At the end of the day, I am still sticking to my plan. My manuscript will still be going to beta readers. I personally believe that having them read it and critique it will help me polish my book before it gets published.

Here are links to some posts that I’ve recently read on self-publishing and why beta readers are important:

http://crimefictioncollective.blogspot.ca/2012/08/three-mistakes-you-dont-want-to-make.html

http://jennymherrera.wordpress.com/2012/05/01/four-reasons-why-you-need-beta-readers/

http://saraflower.wordpress.com/2012/07/13/beta-readers/

What do think? Eliminate beta readers? Rush and publish and keep revising and publishing the same book over and over again?