5 Tips On How to Design a Professional Book Cover

1. Avoid using common fonts.
If you want your book cover to look professional, avoid common fonts like Times New Roman, Arial and Helvetica.

2. Avoid using too many graphics.
If you really want to use a bunch of images, make sure they work together and that they’re professionally done. If not, use one strong image that represents your book and make sure it’s not a generic one.

3. Keep the message simple and clear.
Make sure the book title is easy to find. If you’re going to use a tag line, make it short and catchy.

4. Design a cover that’s easy to read as a thumbnail.
People scan through so many books online. Make sure your thumbnail stands out by designing a cover that looks good big, as well as small. You want people to click on your thumbnail—not skip it.

5. Design a cover that works for your genre.
You want to attract your readers. A good tip is to check out books in your genre and see how their covers are designed. For instance, if you’re a fantasy writer, use “fantasy-like” fonts and images, and so on.

As much as it could be fun to experiment and design your own book cover—hire a designer, if you’re not one. The great thing is you can still share your ideas and they can help make them happen.

Another good tip: If you have postcards, business cards and bookmarks, make sure they match your book cover design. Consistency is important, especially when advertising.

Here are some helpful links:

http://www.thenervousbreakdown.com/jefishman/2011/05/publishing-primacy-–-folio-9-8-book-jacket-design-essentials/

https://www.createspace.com/en/community/docs/DOC-1781

http://www.thebookdesigner.com/2012/06/picking-fonts-for-your-self-published-book/

https://www.createspace.com/en/community/docs/DOC-1511

Before I end this post, I’d like to announce that my book cover for my upcoming novel, HIGH, will be revealed by next week, if not, sooner.

Stay tuned…

5 Tips On How to Design a Professional Book Cover

1. Avoid using common fonts.
If you want your book cover to look professional, avoid common fonts like Times New Roman, Arial and Helvetica.

2. Avoid using too many graphics.
If you really want to use a bunch of images, make sure they work together and that they’re professionally done. If not, use one strong image that represents your book and make sure it’s not a generic one.

3. Keep the message simple and clear.
Make sure the book title is easy to find. If you’re going to use a tag line, make it short and catchy.

4. Design a cover that’s easy to read as a thumbnail.
People scan through so many books online. Make sure your thumbnail stands out by designing a cover that looks good big, as well as small. You want people to click on your thumbnail—not skip it.

5. Design a cover that works for your genre.
You want to attract your readers. A good tip is to check out books in your genre and see how their covers are designed. For instance, if you’re a fantasy writer, use “fantasy-like” fonts and images, and so on.

As much as it could be fun to experiment and design your own book cover—hire a designer, if you’re not one. The great thing is you can still share your ideas and they can help make them happen.

Another good tip: If you have postcards, business cards and bookmarks, make sure they match your book cover design. Consistency is important, especially when advertising.

Here are some helpful links:

http://www.thenervousbreakdown.com/jefishman/2011/05/publishing-primacy-–-folio-9-8-book-jacket-design-essentials/

https://www.createspace.com/en/community/docs/DOC-1781

http://www.thebookdesigner.com/2012/06/picking-fonts-for-your-self-published-book/

https://www.createspace.com/en/community/docs/DOC-1511

Before I end this post, I’d like to announce that my book cover for my upcoming novel, HIGH, will be revealed by next week, if not, sooner.

Stay tuned…

10 Book Cover Designs for Inspiration

Although we say not to judge a book by its cover, we still do.

Book covers are like mini billboard ads. They need to be catchy and memorable. They also need to represent their genres and their stories effectively. With a strong title and a strong design, you can achieve an effective book cover that will make readers want to buy your book and read your story.

If you’re a self-published author getting ready to design or get your book cover designed, here are only a few examples of book covers you can use for inspiration. Pay attention to the elements of each book cover below. As you’ll see, not all successful book covers need to be busy and colorful. Some can be simple but still powerful.

Scroll down and let me know which one makes you stop and look closer.

 

Novel Update: Beta Readers

After editing my novel, HIGH, the last couple of months, I’ve decided it’s a good time to stop and let the Beta Readers take over. This morning, I took a deep breath and sent them my full manuscript.

As well all know getting feedback from others is an important part of the editing process. We can keep rewriting and editing our stories but until we let someone else read them, we will never know what works and what doesn’t.

So now that my manuscript is in the hands of my trusted beta readers, what’s next? Well, I will be focusing on getting my book cover done, and creating my marketing plan. I’m not quite sure how to begin, but regardless—I’m diving in.

Any tips?

 

Novel Update: Beta Readers

After editing my novel, HIGH, the last couple of months, I’ve decided it’s a good time to stop and let the Beta Readers take over. This morning, I took a deep breath and sent them my full manuscript.

As well all know getting feedback from others is an important part of the editing process. We can keep rewriting and editing our stories but until we let someone else read them, we will never know what works and what doesn’t.

So now that my manuscript is in the hands of my trusted beta readers, what’s next? Well, I will be focusing on getting my book cover done, and creating my marketing plan. I’m not quite sure how to begin, but regardless—I’m diving in.

Any tips?