Upcoming Novel: HEARTS AND ERRORS, Chapter 7

 

Chapter 7: Roy

“I’m not with anyone right now,” I say, unable to lie. 

“That makes the two of us,” he says. 

We glance at each other, quiet for a while.

“Why does it feel like the past just happened a few hours ago and not years ago?”

“Maybe because this isn’t over. We’re not over,” he says.

“Trust me. We are.”

#heartsanderrorsanovel

Releasing 1/19/19

A Little Hemingway for Today

From one of my favorite books: A Moveable Feast, by Ernest Hemingway

“When spring came, even the false spring, there were no problems except where to be happiest. The only thing that could spoil a day was people and if you could keep from making engagements, each day had no limits. People were always the limiters of happiness except for the very few that were as good as spring itself.”
-Hemingway (A Moveable Feast)

 

Guest Blogger, Kelly Jarosz: Writing Workshops

It’s time for another guest blog!

Today’s guest blogger is Kelly Jarosz. Kelly and I met at the Paris Writers Workshop last June. I asked her to do a post on writing/writers workshops since she has attended quite a few and also organizes her own.

Meet Kelly…

Kelly Jarosz is a published academic writer and award-winning communications consultant who started writing creatively after moving to Switzerland in 2009. She is co-founder of the Zurich Writers Workshop and will co-teach ‘writing boot camp’ this autumn as part of WriteCon Zurich. These days you can find her in one of Zurich’s many cafes, working on a novel.

In 2010, two other American writers and I decided to stop complaining about the lack of English-language writing instruction in Zurich and create our own workshop. Since then, I’ve attended several writing conferences and organized a few myself.

An ongoing challenge for organizers is providing valuable instruction and inspiration for writers at all experience levels. The challenge for participants lies in finding the right event so the topics aren’t overwhelming or yawn-inducing. Here’s my breakdown of the typical kinds of writing workshops, and which writers would benefit most from each. Keep in mind that many writing events offer a mix of these types.

1) You’re just starting out in creative writing. Maybe you’re already a technical writer or journalist and want to expand your writing abilities. Or maybe you’ve always dabbled in creative writing for yourself and wonder if you could write something other people would enjoy.

A conference with a variety of short sessions is for you. The program will offer a combination of panel discussions, question-and-answer sessions, and workshops. The sessions will have names like, “Writing For Magazines,” or “Finding your Story,” and many will focus on how to generate ideas, from playing language games to mining your own life for literary gold. Also common are sessions about building sustainable writing habits, which is often the biggest obstacle for new writers.

These conferences are great if you have the passion for writing but are unsure whether you prefer fiction or non-fiction, or if you need a boost to get started. You should leave the conference inspired and motivated, with at least a few ideas to develop.

Example: Northwestern University’s Summer Writer’s Conference

2)  You’ve dedicated some time to learning the basics of the writing craft. Maybe you’ve started working out ideas for a story or personal essay on paper. Maybe you even have a draft, but you don’t know how to shape it into something great.

The second kind of workshop often is set up like the first, with a variety of short sessions, but they’re focused on specific aspects of the writing craft, like, “Bringing your Characters to Life,” “Writing Realistic Dialogue,” or “Point of View: Whose Story is It?”. Other times, this type of workshop is led by one instructor, who covers a variety of topics with one group of participants.

Reading examples as a group shows how an aspect of the craft plays out in published works, and in-session exercises provide techniques for developing it in your own writing. You should come away from this workshop ready to delve into learning the craft more deeply on your own and with ideas of how to develop the craft in your own work.

Example: Geneva Writers’ Group conference, Zurich Writers Workshop 2012

3) You’ve dedicated serious time to studying the writing craft, and you’re actively working on a big project: a novel, a memoir, short stories, personal essays. You’re familiar with the vocabulary of writing, and you have a good sense of what should and should not be in your piece. What you don’t know is whether readers understand the story on the page in the way you understand it in your head. You’re ready for a critque-focused workshop.

These workshops require participants to submit a 10-20 page excerpt of their work a month or so ahead of time. The majority of the workshop is dedicated to group discussion of each participant’s piece, often led by an award-winning author. This kind of workshop demands much more time from participants to prepare their own pieces and thoughtful feedback on others’ pieces.

The focused feedback received in these workshops can be invaluable for writers who need fresh sets of eyes on their work after toiling away for so long on it alone. You should leave with a list of specific revisions to be made in your piece and, best of all, an understanding of your piece’s strengths. If you especially appreciated a participant’s feedback, this is your opportunity to invite her to continue working together as critique partners after the workshop ends.

Examples: Paris Writers Workshop, ZWW 2011

Before signing up for a writing event, think about what you expect to be able to do afterwards. Then carefully read the description of the event and its sessions to see if it matches up with your expectations. Feel free to contact the workshop organizers to determine whether they offer what you’re looking for. If not, tell them. It’s likely that they’ll keep your needs in mind for future events.

Whatever your current writing needs, there’s a workshop out there for you. And if there isn’t one nearby, consider organizing one yourself!

 

Thank you for the helpful tips, Kelly!

 

Getting Critiqued

One of the reasons why I wanted to attend the Paris Writers Workshop was because I wanted to see if my writing was up to par. I knew it wasn’t perfect and I needed to know exactly what I needed to work on. I am thankful I went. Each student in the Craft of Fiction class I attended, got a chance to get their story critiqued by the students and the teacher. It was worth it.

Getting critiqued is a gift.

I suggest getting your work read by a couple of people you know and trust and then let strangers read it. There is something amazing about having people you don’t know read and critique it. As much as mom and dad loved your story, chances are, a stranger will give you a more honest feedback. And that’s the point. You want and need honest feedback. A writer’s group or a writer’s workshop is a good place to meet people who will be willing to read and critique your work.

Here is why I think getting your writing critiqued is a gift:

  1. No matter how many times you think you’ve read and edited your work, you can still miss things.
  2. Different people spot different things. One person may notice a typo and another one won’t. Pay attention to each feedback.
  3. Different people can also spot the same things. This is really interesting. If you notice a few people commenting on the same thing, it probably means you need to do some rewriting. Again, pay attention to each feedback.
  4. Not all suggestions apply. If one person says to delete a specific line, but the rest of the group says it works, including you, then don’t delete it.
  5. Keep your target audience in mind when getting feedback. For instance: You’re writing women’s fiction and one person says, “he doesn’t get it” but the women of the group say “they get it”, then you can probably ignore the suggestion. Use your best judgment.
  6. There are things that are clear to you as the writer, but vague to the reader. Getting critiqued will help point these out.
  7. Ask questions. What is it about your story that you feel needs help? Is there a specific dialogue/character/chapter you’re not sure of? This is the time to get answers.
  8. Whatever you learn from each feedback is new knowledge you can apply to any of your stories.

Remember that the people critiquing your work are there to help you—not attack you. Listen to all suggestions and comments before responding. This was a great technique our teacher, Christopher Tilghman used that I think we benefitted from. If it was our story being discussed, we were not allowed to respond until after all suggestions/comments were said. Listening carefully first, instead of responding immediately gave us a better understanding of our work and how we could improve it.

I truly enjoyed our class and I appreciate every feedback I received. I was lucky to be part of such a diverse group of people. Each one had a story to tell. Each one was unique and memorable.

Getting critiqued is both terrifying and satisfying. By the end of it, you become a better writer.

Paris Writers Workshop

I had a wonderful time at the Paris Writers Workshop last week. The workshop offered writing classes that catered to all writers. I originally wanted the Novel class, but by the time I tried to sign up, it was sold out. Not wanting to give up, I searched for another class and found The Craft of Fiction had one opening. I signed up and snagged the last spot.

I think it was meant to be. 😉

Here are a few things I’ve learned from attending the PWW:
1. I learned to drink wine…the right away. (I’m not kidding. They taught us how during the opening ceremony. It’s all about using your senses, not just in drinking wine, but also in writing.)
2. I learned that getting your writing critiqued by other writers is a gift.
Remember: they’re not there to attack you. They’re there to help you.
3. Networking is fun. You’ll be surprised at who you’ll meet. I met a fellow-blogger who I have been following for months. Her blog is called: Becoming Madame.

4. Dialogue isn’t just about the quotes.
5. Traditional Publishing is hard, but it’s not impossible. Hang in there.
6. Self-Publishing is a lot of work, but it can be worth it.
7. Reading a chapter of your book to a group of strangers is exhilarating. If you get a chance to do it, do it. It’s good practice for when you go on book tours.

8. If you really want to be a writer—keep writing, and don’t give up.

The main reason why I wanted to attend the PWW was because I wanted to get my first novel critiqued by a group of writers. I’ve only shared my story with a few people, so I wanted to see what strangers thought of the way I wrote and what I wrote. Although we only covered part of the story, I can apply what I’ve learned throughout the novel.

You’re probably saying I could’ve simply joined a writers group or went to a local workshop, and that’s true. But I had other reasons why I also wanted to go to Paris. If you’ve read my other posts, then you know what they are. No need to bore you again with the details.

Now that I’ve been to a Writers Conference and recently to a Writers Workshop, I can tell you that I’ve learned a lot from both experiences. I recommend both for different reasons.

If you’re deciding between the two, here’s a tip for you:
If you have a polished manuscript and are ready to find an Agent, I suggest you attend a Writers Conference.
If you’ve got a story that is still a work in progress, I suggest you attend a Writers Workshop.

For those of you who are looking for a Writers Workshop, I recommend the Paris Writers Workshop. Writing and Paris go hand in hand. If you need inspiration, The City of Light is the place for you.

Cheers!

To the Craft of Fiction Class at the Paris Writers Workshop

Once in a while, we are lucky enough to meet people that encourage us and inspire us to continue pursuing whatever it is that we love.

I would like to dedicate a post and share a poem I wrote for my teacher and classmates at the Paris Writers Workshop. It is my way of saying, thank you.

NOTE: The names are listed in alphabetical order.

THANK YOU
The introductions, the handshakes
The smiles and the nods

The critiques, the honesty
The conversations and the laughs

Thank you for the time spent
In and out of class

Your friendships,
A remembrance that will forever last

So as we park our words in perfect places
Let hard work be our guide

And as we chase our dreams as writers
Let luck be on our side

Thank you, Mr. Chris Tilghman, Elena, Janet, John, Joy, Kamala,
Kristen, Meredith, Nicole, Oceane, Tom, and Veronica

We were a class at the beginning
By the end, a group of friends

Keep those pens busy
Until we meet again…

To the Craft of Fiction Class at the Paris Writers Workshop

Once in a while, we are lucky enough to meet people that encourage us and inspire us to continue pursuing whatever it is that we love.

I would like to dedicate a post and share a poem I wrote for my teacher and classmates at the Paris Writers Workshop. It is my way of saying, thank you.

NOTE: The names are listed in alphabetical order.

THANK YOU
The introductions, the handshakes
The smiles and the nods

The critiques, the honesty
The conversations and the laughs

Thank you for the time spent
In and out of class

Your friendships,
A remembrance that will forever last

So as we park our words in perfect places
Let hard work be our guide

And as we chase our dreams as writers
Let luck be on our side

Thank you, Mr. Chris Tilghman, Elena, Janet, John, Joy, Kamala,
Kristen, Meredith, Nicole, Oceane, Tom, and Veronica

We were a class at the beginning
By the end, a group of friends

Keep those pens busy
Until we meet again…

My Week in Paris: Day 6

We had an interesting lecture today on networking. We had a panel of 3 writers who have all been published. Their techniques on using social media were all different, but the results are similar. I will talk more about this on another post.

The other lecture we had was on Literary Agents and their roles. Although I’ve researched enough on Agents, there were still helpful tips to be picked up. I will also feature this on another blog post.

Tomorrow, our class will be discussing Narration. My story will be critiqued. Yikes. I’ll let you know how that goes.

The workshop ends tomorrow. I know it’s only been a week, but it feels like forever. I am ready to go home.

My Week in Paris: Day 6

We had an interesting lecture today on networking. We had a panel of 3 writers who have all been published. Their techniques on using social media were all different, but the results are similar. I will talk more about this on another post.

The other lecture we had was on Literary Agents and their roles. Although I’ve researched enough on Agents, there were still helpful tips to be picked up. I will also feature this on another blog post.

Tomorrow, our class will be discussing Narration. My story will be critiqued. Yikes. I’ll let you know how that goes.

The workshop ends tomorrow. I know it’s only been a week, but it feels like forever. I am ready to go home.

My Week in Paris: Day 4

If there were two cities my family and I would move to, it would be New York or Paris. There is something so alive and so inspiring about these two cities.

Maybe my week here in Paris will be the closest thing I’ll ever get to actually living here, but I don’t mind at all. I’ve only been here for 4 days, but I’ve already begun to feel like a “local”. My first trip to Paris in 2004 was about a vacation with my husband. It was romantic and fantastic, and memorable. We did touristy things and had a blast.

But this trip is a little different.

Although I’m still exploring the city, I am not rushing to museums or riding tour buses. Instead, I am waking up in the morning, rushing out with my bag full of manuscripts and notepads, grabbing my croissant and espresso on my way to class, walking with the crowd of locals on their way to work or dropping off their children at school. It’s a different feeling…a different energy.  I stare up at the old buildings with terraces and windows with potted plants against the gloomy sky, and everything seems perfect. With a smile on my face, I walk on the cobblestones with a different rhythm to my steps. I am fully aware that this is a rare and great opportunity, and I am so thankful for it. I am embracing it and cherishing each and every moment that comes along. I have met wonderful people who are as passionate about writing as I am. Most of them are expats who are living in different parts of the world. Their adventures of travel and life are amazing. Our lunches and dinners are filled with conversations about what we’ve done, where we’ve been and where we want to go.

I miss my family like crazy, but what keeps me at ease is the thought that I am only here for a week. This is temporary. Soon, I will have them in my arms again, and at the same time, I will also have the wonderful memory of my short, but full week in Paris.