E-books and Publishing

E-books, self-publishing and traditional publishing have been topics I’ve touched on a lot on my blog. I think as a writer who is “waiting” to get published, I’ve slightly become obsessed with hearing about experiences from other writers of how they got published, whether if it’s through a traditional publisher or not. I guess part of why I am so curious is because I am trying to decide which route to take, once my first novel is edited and ready.

If you’ve written a story and queried a few agents, got signed and not long after, got published—congratulations.

But if you are one of those who have been rejected many times, but still have stories brewing in your heads and you still keep writing books, I say, don’t ever give up. You are a writer and you will get published.

I’m sure you’ve all heard about the e-book millionaire, Amanda Hocking. What I find so inspiring about Amanda’s success story is the fact that despite being rejected by many publishers she didn’t give up. She almost did. But something inside of her told her that she had to try again. Good for her. Now she has a huge following and her stories are read all over the world, and she is only in her mid-twenties. During one of her interviews, she mentioned that she told herself she would get published by the time she was 26, and she was right. But it’s not about getting published at 26. It’s more about setting a goal and owning it. She set a goal, owned it and believed in it, and she succeeded. She didn’t let the agents and publishers decide her fate as a writer.

So how did she do it? Why are her stories selling so well, despite what publishers thought, and why are other e-books not as successful?

This is what I think: Amanda captured a huge audience the moment she published her first book and she sold them at the lowest price, knowing that she would write trilogies. She knew that charging less for the first one of each series would encourage the reader to buy it and decide whether or not they’d want to pay more and keep reading the rest of the stories. Turns out, they liked it so much that they continued buying her books. They wanted more, so she wrote more and she just kept going.

But not all genres can have trilogies and not all genres have an audience as big as hers.

No problem. We’re not all trying to be like Amanda Hocking. But we do want to be successful in whatever genre we write. So what do we do to have successful e-books?

Based on the things I’ve learned recently, especially from the workshop I attended a few weeks ago, here are a few things to consider before self-publishing:

  1. Don’t rush. If your book is not ready, don’t publish it.
  2. Edit, edit, edit before publishing.
  3. No matter what, unless you’re a Graphic Designer, DO NOT design your own book cover. Unfortunately, people do judge a book by its cover, and if it doesn’t look professional, they may not buy it.
  4. Advertise 6 months before publishing.
  5. Self-publishing means you do all the work. Advertising is part of your job.
  6. Make sure you have a platform. Knowing that you have followers before you publish helps you sell your books later.
  7. Even though self-publishing means you do all the work, you can still ask for help or hire professionals to help you edit your work, design your book cover, etcetera. Remember, this book represents you.
  8. Know your audience and market to them.
  9. Network.
  10. Keep writing. Write and publish a book every year. You want your readers to keep buying and supporting your books.

It’s a good feeling to know that getting published no longer means it’s only up to “them”. With the options we now have out there—it’s really up to us to decide when we get published.

Best of luck.

A Poem for You

LOVE

Love gently sings
Boldly dances
And sometimes stings

Love tightly grips
Softly carries
But often slips

Love blindly follows
Quietly rushes
Like there’s no tomorrow

Love swiftly flies
Blissfully travels
And reaches a high

Love calmly holds
Carefully armors
Your heart as a whole

A HUGE thank you to Cara for her pledge! 

If you would like to help support my writing project, please click here.

Again, any pledge would mean the world to me. Remember, there are perks too for helping.

BONUS perk for writers who are self-publishing. I’ll even design your book cover!

Thank you for support.

Writing tip #7: Know Your Target Audience

You’ve written a book and you’re ready to get it published. Question is, do you know your target audience?

If you say it’s “everyone”, you may have a problem. Everyone is too broad and everyone is not what agents and publishers want to hear.

To get a better idea of your audience, start by thinking of your genre. Knowing your genre can help identify your audience.

For instance, let’s say you’ve written a love story and it falls under Women’s Fiction. Now you know a little more about who your readers are: women. But let’s get even more specific.

Try asking yourself the following questions (modify these questions based on your genre):
What’s the age group of these women?
Are they single, married or divorced?
Are they mothers?
Are they career women?
What sorts of books do they read? Who are the authors?

Once you’ve answered these questions, you’ll know exactly who your target audience is. This will help you pitch your story to the right agents. And if you’re self-publishing, this will help you in marketing your book.

 

An Interview with Lori L. Otto, Author of the Emi Lost and Found Series

Recently, e-books and self-publishing have been hot topics on my blog that I felt the need to interview another self-published author. I came across some rave reviews on the Emi Lost and Found series on twitter and knew immediately that Lori L. Otto was exactly who I wanted to interview.

If you’ve contemplated on self-publishing or have questions on e-books and what it means to be an independent author, or you simply want to learn about the talented author of the Emi Lost and Found series, then this interview is for you.

Meet Lori L. Otto:

What inspired you to write the EMI LOST & FOUND series?
After reading a very popular young adult series, and its subsequent not-so-young-adult fan fiction, I realized there was a need for an epic, romantic series for adults.  I first didn’t really know what the story was going to be.  Instead, the three main characters revealed themselves to me.  After I had a clear understanding of who they were, the story began to unfold.

Did you always know you were writing a series, or did the idea happen in the midst of writing your first novel?
No, this was intended to be one novel.  When I outlined everything, it was all meant to be contained in one book, written in the same way it’s published now.  I wanted the three different narrators telling their stories, so when each of their story lines grew to more than 100,000 words each, I knew I had to break it up.  Fortunately, with the way I’d decided to use three narrators, that lent itself well to breaking it up into three separate novels.  That’s why there’s an intro by Emi in the first book and an epilogue by her in the last book.  

Who edits your books? Did you hire an editor?
I have a “team” of well-educated friends who love to read, and I consider myself lucky.  This means that about 10 people get to read the books before they’re published, and it’s amazing how each friend sees different mistakes.  I don’t hire them to do it– they do it voluntarily because they get to read the books before anyone else.  I also read and re-read the Emi Lost & Found series about twenty times on my own, and still found a few errors right up to the publication date.  I will say, I’ve received reviews from multiple people who compliment my editor because there are so few mistakes.  I do pride myself on this, and strive to have them be as error-free as possible.

Did you ever consider traditional publishing or did you always know you wanted to self-publish? How did you decide?
I queried agents for about nine months before I decided to self-publish.  I received quite a few rejection letters, many of them because of the length of the novels.  That seemed to be a big hang-up for a lot of agents, and in traditional publishing, I understand that can be a problem, putting forth so much money on a long book by an unknown author.  I totally see where they’re coming from.  But times are changing, and I believed in the books so much that I wasn’t willing to cut them down, and really felt like they would be successful in their entirety in e-book form.  This is what eventually made me decide to self-publish.  Even with their lengths (125,000 words for Lost and Found; 129,000 words for Time Stands Still; and 126,000 for Never Look Back), readers have devoured the series in a couple of days and begged for more.

Describe your experience with self-publishing. How long did the whole process take? Did you hire people to help you?
I thought the actual process of self-publishing was easy, and it didn’t take too long.  I first self-published paperbacks, using CreateSpace, because I wanted to have a physical book for myself and many of my friends, and also because I understood the process better.  When people would talk about formatting for ePub and things like that, I was a little frightened, but once I started reading the requirements of sites like Smashwords, Kindle Digital Publishing and PubIt, it actually was very easy.  They all accept files formatted in Word, so what was good for one site was fine for another with just a few modifications of the title page.  I published first on Smashwords, and did a lot of trial and error adjusting for about three weeks.  Mainly it was from viewing the book on my Kindle and seeing mistakes I hadn’t seen before.  (Many of my test readers had Smashwords copies to work with.)  I didn’t hire anyone to help at first, but the biggest lesson I’ve learned in this process is that people do judge books by their covers– and my original covers say nothing about the story.  Just recently, I’ve hired an illustrator to redesign the covers for me.  The first is complete, and the second and third should be done by late April.  I know that I could have this done cheaper than what I pay, but I think her work is worth it.

What are the advantages and disadvantages of self-publishing?
Advantages: The author is in total control.
Disadvantage: The author is in total control.  
Self-publishing truly is a free-for-all at this point, with no standards to uphold.  I’m happy that I got to make all the decisions on what could be included, or what needed to be edited out.  But anyone who self-publishes will also be forced to face all of the bad work that’s been rushed to publication just for money.  The bulk of these are short stories (that aren’t necessarily marketed as such, but are often between 1000 – 5000 words) that are erotic in nature…and I’m using that “erotic” term rather liberally.  I’m not a prude by any means– there is a healthy amount of tasteful sex in all of my current books– but the things I’ve seen are shocking to me.  I imagine they make a lot of money, though, so it just encourages more and more of these stories to be slapped together and uploaded.  Sometimes, I think self-publishing is too easy.

Would you recommend self-publishing?
I would recommend it, and have to multiple other authors I know, provided they have proper expectations of what will happen and how much they need to be involved to generate sales.  When I published, the story about Amanda Hocking had been floating around the Internet, and I’ll be honest, I had very unrealistic expectations.  I didn’t think I’d become a millionaire overnight, but I thought I’d make more money than I have and didn’t think I’d have to work so hard to sell my books.  Marketing is the hardest thing about self-publishing.  I’m a good writer, but even though I worked in marketing for ten years, I still fail on a daily basis in this arena.  I’m pretty introverted, and that seems to work against me.

Would you consider traditional publishing if a Literary Agent approached you now?
Of course I would!  I’d be a fool not to.  I’m working on two other series now and am considering trying to get an agent for at least one of them.  Again, I believe that my books are good and that women who read them will be drawn to the characters, but my biggest problem is finding readers.  If an agent could help me with that, I might be willing to make a few concessions.

What makes someone an Independent Author?
I guess my definition is someone who writes and/or publishes without the backing of an agent or publishing house– a writer who is left to handle every aspect of writing, editing and promoting the book on their own or by using their own resources (time, money, etc.).

How do you market your books? What has been the most effective?
Not well.  😉  I have a Twitter account that I use, setting up different campaigns and scheduling tweets in bulk on a daily basis.  As you can imagine, this is tedious and a little exhausting, and I’m not sure how effective it actually is.  I know when I don’t tweet at all, I get very few hits to my blog, book sales pages, etc.  When I do tweet, even though I don’t have a lot of sales to show for it, the page counters tell me that the word is getting out there.  It’s just very hit-or-miss, and I haven’t found a way to target my specific market yet using Twitter.  I also do have a Facebook page, and quite a few people who’ve read my books have found me there on their own.  I only recently started using this as a tool to try to sell more books, because I figured most of the people who “like” my page have read the series already.  But, again, it’s a good way to keep the word out there and to keep the books top-of-mind.  If someone needs a gift for their wife, friend, whoever, they may decide that my series is a good gift after seeing a reminder post on the Facebook page.  I’ve used email marketing, which was helpful at first, but most of my list was made up of people I knew, so after they purchased the books, the emails just seemed to be redundant, reaching the same audience, and I was worried of becoming “spam.”  I’ve done a few book giveaways on goodreads.com, and while many people sign up to win– and many put the book on their “to read” list– this hasn’t seemed to really generate sales for me, either.  I’m a member of a few different Independent Authors groups online, and the members are very good in helping to spread the word about other Indie author’s books on Twitter and Facebook.  The Indie Author community is vast and very supportive of one another.

What are blog tours and do you participate?
I’ve never done a blog tour.  I know I should, and I know it would help, but I just haven’t taken the time to research what is involved.  

Is your book series only available electronically or do you also have printed copies?
It’s available in both formats.  The paperbacks can be purchased on Amazon.com or barnesandnoble.com.  E-books are available for the Kindle, Nook, iPad, iPhone, Sony eReader, Kobo, Android eReaders and PDFs for the computer.

If you could do it all over again, would you still pick self-publishing?
Yes, I would.  I wanted my story to be out in the world.  Even if I don’t have a million readers, the ones who have contacted me from South Africa, Ireland, Australia, India, and everywhere else in this vast world make this whole process worthwhile to me.  

What advice can you give writers who are having trouble deciding between traditional publishing and self-publishing?
I’ve encouraged writers to try the traditional publishing route first.  I do think that they have ways to promote the book that most Indie authors are lacking, and marketing plays such a huge part in the success of books and requires so much time and energy.  If they don’t find an agent after six to twelve months– and if they just want to share their story with other readers– then I’d suggest self-publishing.  The fact that I don’t have an agent is not a failure on my part, in my opinion.  It just means that my books didn’t fit into a traditional mold or category that the agents were willing to work with.  (On a side note, I think my books fall between genres, and if I had understood what this would mean for my book in the long run, I might have done something differently.)

What makes you unique as a writer? Describe your writing style.
I’m a very emotive writer, and I like developing characters.  I write stories that people can relate to and get involved in.  The worlds described in my books create a nice escape, and I think the situations are able to generate real emotions.  In fact, quite a few readers have told me they had to take breaks from my second book, Time Stands Still, because they couldn’t see the words through their tears.  Many reviewers have said that they feel like Nate, Emi and Jack are their friends.  That’s a huge compliment to me.

Who is your favorite author?
I love Vladimir Nabokov’s writing style.  I think Lolita is a fascinating story and a beautiful piece of art.

What is your favorite book? What are you reading now?
Again, I love Lolita for its prose.  Nothing compares to it, in my mind.  I love most well-written books with a love story, but I don’t read romance novels.  Right now, I’m re-reading the Hunger Games so I can be ready for the movie.  I thought Suzanne Collins wrote a thought-provoking series about what society could become– and it also gave me a sweet love story to follow.

Define a good book.
A good book provides an escape for the reader.  It can transport them through time and space, taking them to places they’ve never been and may never see.  It captures their imagination and leaves them thinking about the characters long after they’ve read the last page.  It’s something that keeps them up late at night reading.  It’s something they don’t want to put down, and something they want to pick up again to re-read later on down the line.

Define a good writer.
For my genre, which I consider to be women’s fiction, a good writer is someone who can get in the head of a certain character, and describe the world through that person… and then be able to do that with many other supporting characters as well.  She’s someone who knows the background of everyone involved so that they can accurately predict motives and reactions to make the story as real as possible.  She’s able to accurately communicate situations to let the reader develop their own feelings and emotions.

If you could describe your book series in one sentence, what would it be?
Having given up on her ideal love, Emi Hennigan suffers a great loss after taking a chance with her best friend– only to discover that what she’s always been looking for is still out there.

Are you working on your next book? Will it be part of another book series?
I’m working on five other books right now: three in one series, and two in another (which will eventually have a third book).  For those of you who have read Emi Lost & Found, the second series (chronologically) revolves around Jack’s brother, Steven.  The third series (which takes place thirteen years after Never Look Back) is about Livvy.  The other series are spin-offs of the original, where other characters take center stage.

And finally, what tips can you give writers who are considering self-publishing?
Don’t get frustrated and don’t give up.  (These are tips I have to remind myself of sometimes, too.)  Keep trying new things, and network with other authors.  Make sure your book is as polished as it can be.  Present it as if an agent just might pick it up one day and read it cover to cover.  It needs to be the best it can be.

Thank you Lori for giving me the opportunity to interview you. It was a blast!

For more information on Lori L. Otto and her Emi Lost and Found series, visit her blog at: http://authorlorilotto.wordpress.com/

Where to buy her books: http://authorlorilotto.wordpress.com/where-to-buy/

Check out more interviews.

Why We Don’t Give Up

So you’ve sent out dozens of query letters, sent out partials, received rejection letters, attended writers conferences, and still—no representation. Do you stop trying? 

I met a writer at a conference last year that told me he’s been attending the same conference for years, trying to sell his book idea to agents and editors and have not succeeded. It’s not an easy task and yet he still keeps trying.

There are many possible reasons as to why he hasn’t gotten signed. He could have an excellent story, but his query letter is poor. Or have a great story, but not a sellable one. Or have a great plot, but it’s not well written, or not edited, or he’s been pitching to the wrong agents and editors or his book is simply not ready, or we can go on speculating.

The truth is, we don’t know why he hasn’t gotten signed. But this goes for a lot of us who have patiently held on to our manuscripts for weeks, months, or even years, and have sent out queries and prayed for the perfect agent to give us that phone call that will change our lives forever and sign us and make us millionaires or best sellers, or whatever else we dream of being. In the end, we are writers who want to get published. We want our stories to make it, just like the rest of them.

But how long are we willing to wait…

Before we move on and decide that maybe the manuscript we have now is not meant to be our first book?
Before we move on and write our next story?
Before we say that maybe we don’t want to wait for a Literary Agent to dictate when we will be published authors.
Before we say that our story is good and that maybe self-publishing is the way to go.
Before we say that this is our dream, therefore it is up to us to make it real.
Before we give up.

But you see, we don’t give up. Our stories exist because we were called to write them. Something, somewhere gave us the idea and it was our job to write it down. And we did. There is a reason for that, and that’s why we are here still trying.

The thought of landing a Literary Agent can sometimes be frustrating and discouraging. The thought of self-publishing can be daunting and overwhelming, so what do we do? The reality is, we wrote a book. A book we believe in, and we want it published someday, somehow, somewhere.

And now, we must ask ourselves:
Do we want to be traditionally published or do we want to self-publish?
Do we want to control our destiny or wait for a star to fall?

I say we continue to research, network, educate ourselves, and know our options.

And while we wait to see our name in lights…we keep writing.

Everything you need to know about self-publishing an e-book

Okay, so since my last post, I haven’t been able to stop pondering about self-publishing e-books. I wandered around the Kindle Publishing Guide page on Amazon.com and read about the steps on how to self-publish and I must say, it made my head spin a little. There are quite a few steps to take, which is not surprising, just overwhelming at first glance.

If you’re wondering if I’m considering self-publishing, I am…I think. Well, sort of. It’s tempting.

If you’re someone who is definitely considering it but have no idea where to begin, I came across a great blog site that lists everything you need to know about self-publishing your e-book(s). I found it to be very informative. Check it out.

http://www.rachellegardner.com/2011/07/how-i-created-my-first-e-book/

And if you’re someone who has already self-published your e-book(s) and have had some positive results, and feel like sharing your story, please do so. I would love to hear from you.

Thanks for stopping by.

Self-publishing e-books = Success?

Possibly.

Are you done writing your novel (and by done I mean you’ve written your best and you’ve edited it like crazy)? Have you been looking for an Agent but haven’t found one to represent you? Have you sent out queries to 5, 10, 30 Agents and have received nothing but rejection letters? Don’t give up yet. This article might just be your answer.

http://www.usatoday.com/life/books/news/story/2011-12-14/self-published-authors-ebooks/51851058/1

But could it really be that gone are the days of toiling over writing queries and receiving rejection letters? Could you really write a story and publish it without the help of a Literary Agent? And can you really get published and gain success all on your own?

Well, according to this article, with e-books, anything is possible. Just ask authors like Michael Prescott, Barbara Freethy and Amanda Hocking.

What do you think? I would love to hear your thoughts on this.

An Interview with Samantha Sotto, Author of Before Ever After

A few days ago, I mentioned that in order to answer one of the most common questions writers have regarding getting an Agent or getting Self-Published, I would interview two authors—one who got a Literary Agent and one who is
Self-Published.

I was fortunate enough to snag an interview with the talented Samantha Sotto, author of Before Ever After. Samantha went with a Literary Agent, which worked out well for her.

Check out our interview below:

COREY: When did you know you wanted to become a writer?
SAM SOTTO:
After I typed “The End.” The dream of becoming a published writer took shape after I finished writing Before Ever After. Prior to that, it was simply a fun thing to do while waiting to pick my son up from school.

COREY: What inspired you to write Before Ever After?  
SAM SOTTO:
There are two ways you can deal with traffic: you can sit in your car and slowly go insane, or you can plot out a novel.

It might have been the Dr. Who marathon I had just emerged from or the “hangover” I was nursing after reading the Time Traveler’s Wife (I couldn’t stop crying about Henry!) or a combination of both that made Max, my main character, hitch a ride with me that afternoon. I didn’t know much about him then, except that he had a talent for staying alive, had a soft spot for chickens, ran an offbeat European tour, and was not a vampire.

I began to wonder more about his “lifetimes” and the people he had met along the way. That’s when I discovered that he had a wife, or rather, a widow – who had no idea who he really was. I knew then that I had to hop aboard Max’s Volkswagen van and take a detour into his and Shelley’ s story.

You might say that the research for this book was done years before I even had the idea to write it. I lived, studied, and traveled through Europe and have always been drawn to its crooked cobblestone alleys and tucked away corners. These forgotten nooks whispered stories that the history books left out. The “gaps” I found between by my travel scrapbooks and formal research became the places and times Max filled in with his secrets.

COREY: If you were to tell us about your book in one sentence, what would it be?
SAM SOTTO:
It’s a quirky fairytale for grown-ups about love, loss, and all that comes before ever after.

COREY: How long did it take you to write your novel?
SAM SOTTO:
About a year.

COREY: Did you ever consider Self-Publishing or did you always know you wanted to send your manuscript out to Literary Agents? How did you decide?
SAM SOTTO:
I only started researching about the publishing when I finished the book. I knew absolutely nothing about the process so when I saw a second hand copy of The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Getting Published on sale, I bought it. That’s where I learned that I needed to find a literary agent. By default, that’s what I pursued.

COREY: Describe the process of getting published. How long did it take you to find your Agent? How long after you found your Agent did it take to get your book published?
SAM SOTTO:
Google became my best friend during my three-month agent hunt. I scoured the web for agents whom I thought would be a good fit for my book. I made a shortlist, sent out my query letter, and crossed my fingers and all appropriate appendages. But I didn’t send out my letter to everyone on my list. There was an agent that I particularly liked and so I decide to “save” her until I got feedback from the other agents. I was rejected a number of times, but luckily, I also received requests. When about four or five agents had my full manuscript, I found the courage to send my letter to her. She read my query, requested for the full manuscript the next day, read the book overnight, and made me an offer before the other agents had finished reading what I had sent them. She asked me to make a few revisions and when the book was ready, she pitched it to publishers. After about a month, she sold the book.

COREY: Who read your manuscript before you sent it out? Did you have it edited? Were you part of a Writer’s Group?
SAM SOTTO:
I sent the finished chapters to my mom and husband. They read the book in “real time” as I wrote it. My mom made sure that my T’s were crossed and my I’s were dotted. I was not a part of a formal writer’s group but I did join support forums online.

COREY: Have you joined any writing competitions?
SAM SOTTO:
Does an essay writing contest in 6th grade count? 🙂

COREY: What genre does your book belong to?  
SAM SOTTO:
Is Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtle a genre. No? Um…okay. The book crosses over genres – mystery, history, romance, humor. It also has a little bit of magical realism on its mother’s side. 🙂

COREY: Describe your writing style.
SAM SOTTO:
Quirky with a hint of lime.

COREY: Who is your favorite author, and why?
SAM SOTTO:
Neil Gaiman. I want to be him when I grow up. He builds worlds I want to live in.

COREY: Define a good book.
SAM SOTTO:
I like books that have characters that walk around in your head long after you’ve finished reading.

COREY: Define a good writer.
SAM SOTTO:
A good writer is an invisible one.

COREY: What is your favorite book? What are you reading now?
SAM SOTTO:
Green Eggs and Ham by Dr. Seuss. (Sorry, Neil.) I’m not reading any book at the moment. Sadly, I can’t read while I’m writing. My imaginary friends are a chatty bunch and take up the limited space in my head.

COREY: How has being a published author changed your life?
SAM SOTTO:
It hasn’t. I just get a whole lot more email – that I promise to get to. Pinky swear.

COREY: How do you balance being a writer and being a mom?
SAM SOTTO:
Being a mom comes first. I only write when the kids are in school.

COREY: What inspires you to write?
SAM SOTTO:
The fire-breathing deadline I have at the end of the month.

COREY: Are you working on your second book?
SAM SOTTO:
I’m wrestling with it now. It has me in a choke-hold. Send help.

COREY: What tips can you give other writers who are waiting to get published?
SAM SOTTO:
Show up for work even if inspiration calls in sick.

Thanks Samantha for allowing me to pick your brain. It was a lot of fun.

If you’d like to check out Samantha’s blog and/or buy her book, check out her website for more information:
http://samanthasotto.com/

Before Ever After is also available on Amazon.com. 

Come back soon for my upcoming interview with a Self-Published author.

To Get a Literary Agent or to Self-Publish, That is the Question.

So you’ve finished your manuscript and you can’t wait to get it published. Now the question is, do you get a Literary Agent or do you self-publish? This is a question I have been asked many times and my usual answer is, it all depends. Depends on your book, and what your goal is as a writer.

But there are many reasons why some writers get an Agent and why some self-publish, but what are they?

To help answer this question (and other questions), I decided I would interview two authors—an author who got a Literary Agent, and an author who is self-publishing or is self-published.

I am happy to announce that the author I picked who got a Literary Agent, and who  agreed to an interview with me, is Samantha Sotto. She is the author of the novel, Before Ever After. She will be my very first guest on my blog and it is an honor to have her.

Check back soon to read my interview with Samantha Sotto.